EQUALITY, JUSTICE, FREEDOM AND HAPPINESS FOR ALL WOMEN IN MEXICO

que-es-fondo-semillas

What is Fondo Semillas?

Semillas is a non-profit organization focused on improving women’s lives in Mexico. We dream of a country where all women, indigenous, mestiza, black, young, migrant, heterosexual, lesbian, mothers, and students alike, can make their own decisions and have access to health services, a decent job, justice, and happiness..

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CHANGE MORE WOMEN’S LIVES

programas

Programs

elementos-iconos-home

843

projects supported
in 27 years

659530

women benefited directly

2.2

million people benefited indirectly 

19

million dollars
invested in women’s projects

testimonials

Testimonials

Tanya Pliego

“I blindly trust Fondo Semillas. I trust their professionalism and their proposal of empowering women as a long term objective with a multiplying effect, but, above all, I trust their dedication and commitment to achieve their goals with warmth, delight, and empathy.”

Tiaré Scanda

“Being part of Fondo Semillas is a privilege: the privilege of giving oneself; of interweaving concerns, abilities, energies, and resources with audacious, productive, creative, combative women who are committed to building a better country.”

Carmen Aristegui

“Fondo Semillas seeks to promote a sense of solidarity between women. It is a wide, generous, efficient, and trustworthy path where we can make our contribution and fulfill our desire to collaborate towards creating a better society.”

our-blog

Our Blog

Which women are philanthropy leaving behind?

Imagine this: late one afternoon in Thailand, as you walk around Chiang Mai looking for a spot to sip a ...
Read More

Traveling alone is different if you are a woman than if you are a man

Traveling alone is different if you are a woman than if you are a man. Among the many recommendations for ...
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“I can now look after my children”
The story of Consuelo, a worker in the Dignidad y Justicia workshop

My name is Consuelo Hernández. I’m 39 years old, and I am from Piedras Negras, Mexico. I had to start ...
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body

Body

The body is women’s first space of self-determination and an essential element of the feminist agenda.
Through its Body program Fondo Semillas supports groups whose work focuses on helping women decide freely over their bodies. Women who want to be mothers, for example, must be able to decide when and how to get pregnant, as well as receive attention for their physical and emotional health during their pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum period, with full respect of their rights and where they are protagonists of the process.
Reproductive freedom also implies that maternity should not be a punishment for women who have not looked for it. This includes the possibility of deciding whether or not she wishes to continue with the pregnancy and access to its legal and safe termination.
Likewise, we work to eradicate cultural violence surrounding women’s bodies and that may be observed in a growing number of cases of sexual harassment, rapes, diverse expressions of gender based violence, and feminicides.

The Body program includes, among other topics:

  • Sexuality and Youth
  • Safe Motherhood
  • Right to Choose
  • Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights
  • Physical and Sexual Violence
  • Feminicides
  • Women with disabilities
  • Women who have been victims of human trafficking

Stories

Many paths lead to becoming an activist, but it always begins with becoming aware of our realities. Vianeth Rojas’ path began when she was 24 years…

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SOME DATA

  • In Mexico, an indigenous woman is 3 times more likely to die during pregnancy, childbirth or postpartum period than a non-indigenous woman (CONAPO).
  • Each year there are over 1.5 million illegal and unsafe abortions.
  • Only 20% of women of fertile age use a contraceptive in their first sexual relationship
  • There are 6 feminicides each day in Mexico.

OUR WORK

  • Over 84 million pesos have been invested in this program.
  • 347 projects supported in these topics, 47% of the total
  • Oaxaca, Guerrero, Chiapas, and Chihuahua, are the states that have received most support

Sources: BODY: CONAPO, INEGI, Inmujeres, information from local NGOs

how-to-participate

How to participate?

Your donation sows change for women in Mexico. Join us!

Web

A birthday with a good cause

You can invite your friends to make a donation to Fondo Semillas in your honor instead of giving you a birthday gift. We will supply materials and information that you can share on social media with #BirthdayWithACause, along with the total amount raised.

Web

A challenge for Fondo Semillas

Invite your friends and family to support your challenge. For instance:

  • “If we raise $500 USD to support Fondo Semillas, I’ll ride the subway wearing my favorite costume and share my picture with the hashtag #ForFondoSemillas.”
  • “If we raise $1,500 USD together to support Fondo Semillas, I’ll cut my hair and share my picture with the hashtag #ForFondoSemillas.”
  • “If we raise $2,500 USD, I’ll run a marathon and share my picture with the hashtag #ForFondoSemillas”
Web

Fundraising dinner or party

Sell tickets for a fundraising dinner or party with your friends.

  1. Choose which of our Program’s you find most inspiring (Body, Work, Land or Identities) and define where you would like your donation to go.
  2. Set a fundraising goal and a donation sum for each guest.
  3. Define your guest list, the date, and start organizing the dinner or party!

Get in touch with Karina De la Torre ([email protected], 55530109 ext. 202)), who will guide you and supply materials for all of these activities.

You can also become a recurrent donor.

There are two ways to do this:

ALL DONATIONS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE

equipo-operativo

Operating Team

Laura García

Laura García

Executive Director

She studied international relations and holds an M.A. in Peace and International Safety at the University of King’s College at London. She worked at the International Criminal Court and was a consultant for Mexico at the International Center for Transitional Justice. She is a Board member for Women’s Funding Network (WFN).

Jenny Barry

Jenny Barry

Head of Development

Originally from Baltimore, USA, she’s thrilled to live in the land of tamales and tortillas. She holds a Master’s in Gender and Development from the University of Sussex, England where she focused on analyzing the distribution of foreign funds for organizations that work with sexual and reproductive rights in Mexico.

Tania Turner

Tania Turner

Head of Programs

She holds a B.A. in Sociology and a Master’s degree in Political and Social Sciences from the UNAM. She has been a monitoring and evaluation analyst for Freedom House Mexico and Research in Health, and Demographics (Insad). She is part of Rizoma Collective, focused on recovering traditional knowledge and urban gardening.

Erika Tamayo

Erika Tamayo

Communications Coordinator

Erika studied communications at the Ibero and has 23 years of professional experience in the private and public sectors, as well as non-profits. She is in charge of designing and executing the organization’s online and offline communications strategies. She is a perinatal educator and her passion is respected childbirth.

Lucía Hidalgo

Lucía Hidalgo

Office Manager

Psychologist with a Master’s in Human Rights and Democratization in Latin America and the Caribbean. She has focused on women’s rights, migration, and public policy. She collaborates with the International Film Festival with Gender Perspective and gives workshops with the Popular Education with Women Collective.

Dirce Navarrete

Dirce Navarrete

Program Officer

Dirce is a political scientist from the Department of Political and Social Sciences at the UNAM. She is an activist specialized in youth, sexual rights, and women’s political participation. She has been involved in the feminist movement since she was 18 years old. Through her participation she has learned that networks of women save lives.

Brenda Neria

Brenda Neria

Program Officer

Brenda holds a B.A. in Latin American Studies from the UNAM. She has been research assistant to the Interdisciplinary Women’s Studies Program (PIEM) from the Colegio de Mexico; as well as been in charge of the planning and logistics area for the Mexico: A Multicultural Nation University Program at the UNAM.

Whitley Raney

Whitley Raney

Development Officer

She holds a Masters in Public Health with a concentration in Global Transmigration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the United States. She has worked with programs focused on migrant and refugee health and public policy with the UN Migration Agency and various NGOs in Mexico and the United States, and currently collaborates with a health program at the migration detention center in Mexico City.

Karina De la Torre

Karina De la Torre

Individual Donor Officer

She studied Business Administration at La Salle University and holds a Master’s in Social Marketing. She has over 14 years of experience in fundraising and public relations working for national and international NGOs such as Greenpeace, Save the Children; Flora, Fauna y Cultura de México, and Amigos de Sian Ka’an.

Angélica Gómez

Angélica Gómez

Program Officer

She holds a B.A. in Latin American Studies from the UNAM. During the past few years she has become more involved in the struggle for women’s rights and the feminist movement. She is convinced that only solidary and communal alliances will generate a more just and decent world for everyone.

Montserrat Escobar Maitrett

Montserrat Escobar Maitrett

Program Officer

Montserrat is a political scientist, graduated from the Department of Higher Studies Acatlán at the UNAM. She is enthusiastic about the study, analysis, and bridging of diverse political practices that organized women apply in order to be, to exist, and to transform their reality.

Guillermo Aceves

Guillermo Aceves

General Accountant

He has a degree in Public Accounting from La Salle University. He is certified as a Junior Specialist Consultant in Business. He did his social service in CADES, Learning and Development Communities, a school regularization program for educationally disadvantaged students from elementary school to university.

Sayuri Alducin

Sayuri Alducin

Administrative Officer

Sayuri studied Administration and Psychology at the Autonomous Metropolitan University. She has experience working in civil society organizations in the areas of culture and film.

Elizabeth Gutiérrez

Elizabeth Gutiérrez

Administrative Officer

Elizabeth is an accountant, graduate of the UNAM. She has worked in civil society organizations in the areas of finance, education, culture, and film, with a particular focus on children. She likes to read and write short stories.

Claudia Liceaga

Claudia Liceaga

Administrative Officer

She studied Public Administration at the School of Commerce and Administration (ESCA) under the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN). She has been at Fondo Semillas for over five years and since then has been in charge of administering Fondo Semillas’ grants for its grantees.

Laura García

Laura García

Executive Director

She studied international relations and holds an M.A. in Peace and International Safety at the University of King’s College at London. She worked at the International Criminal Court and was a consultant for Mexico at the International Center for Transitional Justice. She is a Board member for Women’s Funding Network (WFN).

Jenny Barry

Jenny Barry

Head of Development

Originally from Baltimore, USA, she’s thrilled to live in the land of tamales and tortillas. She holds a Master’s in Gender and Development from the University of Sussex, England where she focused on analyzing the distribution of foreign funds for organizations that work with sexual and reproductive rights in Mexico.

Tania Turner

Tania Turner

Head of Programs

She holds a B.A. in Sociology and a Master’s degree in Political and Social Sciences from the UNAM. She has been a monitoring and evaluation analyst for Freedom House Mexico and Research in Health, and Demographics (Insad). She is part of Rizoma Collective, focused on recovering traditional knowledge and urban gardening.

Erika Tamayo

Erika Tamayo

Communications Coordinator

Erika studied communications at the Ibero and has 23 years of professional experience in the private and public sectors, as well as non-profits. She is in charge of designing and executing the organization’s online and offline communications strategies. She is a perinatal educator and her passion is respected childbirth.

Lucía Hidalgo

Lucía Hidalgo

Office Manager

Psychologist with a Master’s in Human Rights and Democratization in Latin America and the Caribbean. She has focused on women’s rights, migration, and public policy. She collaborates with the International Film Festival with Gender Perspective and gives workshops with the Popular Education with Women Collective.

Dirce Navarrete

Dirce Navarrete

Program Officer

Dirce is a political scientist from the Department of Political and Social Sciences at the UNAM. She is an activist specialized in youth, sexual rights, and women’s political participation. She has been involved in the feminist movement since she was 18 years old. Through her participation she has learned that networks of women save lives.

Brenda Neria

Brenda Neria

Program Officer

Brenda holds a B.A. in Latin American Studies from the UNAM. She has been research assistant to the Interdisciplinary Women’s Studies Program (PIEM) from the Colegio de Mexico; as well as been in charge of the planning and logistics area for the Mexico: A Multicultural Nation University Program at the UNAM.

Whitley Raney

Whitley Raney

Development Officer

She holds a Masters in Public Health with a concentration in Global Transmigration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the United States. She has worked with programs focused on migrant and refugee health and public policy with the UN Migration Agency and various NGOs in Mexico and the United States, and currently collaborates with a health program at the migration detention center in Mexico City.

Karina De la Torre

Karina De la Torre

Individual Donor Officer

She studied Business Administration at La Salle University and holds a Master’s in Social Marketing. She has over 14 years of experience in fundraising and public relations working for national and international NGOs such as Greenpeace, Save the Children; Flora, Fauna y Cultura de México, and Amigos de Sian Ka’an.

Angélica Gómez

Angélica Gómez

Program Officer

She holds a B.A. in Latin American Studies from the UNAM. During the past few years she has become more involved in the struggle for women’s rights and the feminist movement. She is convinced that only solidary and communal alliances will generate a more just and decent world for everyone.

Montserrat Escobar Maitrett

Montserrat Escobar Maitrett

Program Officer

Montserrat is a political scientist, graduated from the Department of Higher Studies Acatlán at the UNAM. She is enthusiastic about the study, analysis, and bridging of diverse political practices that organized women apply in order to be, to exist, and to transform their reality.

Guillermo Aceves

Guillermo Aceves

General Accountant

He has a degree in Public Accounting from La Salle University. He is certified as a Junior Specialist Consultant in Business. He did his social service in CADES, Learning and Development Communities, a school regularization program for educationally disadvantaged students from elementary school to university.

Sayuri Alducin

Sayuri Alducin

Administrative Officer

Sayuri studied Administration and Psychology at the Autonomous Metropolitan University. She has experience working in civil society organizations in the areas of culture and film.

Elizabeth Gutiérrez

Elizabeth Gutiérrez

Administrative Officer

Elizabeth is an accountant, graduate of the UNAM. She has worked in civil society organizations in the areas of finance, education, culture, and film, with a particular focus on children. She likes to read and write short stories.

Claudia Liceaga

Claudia Liceaga

Administrative Officer

She studied Public Administration at the School of Commerce and Administration (ESCA) under the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN). She has been at Fondo Semillas for over five years and since then has been in charge of administering Fondo Semillas’ grants for its grantees.

board-directors-assembly

Board of Directors and Assembly

Paloma Bonfil

Paloma Bonfil

President

A historian and ethno-historian, Paloma also holds a PhD in rural sociology. She has dedicated her work to indigenous women from the diverse positions she has held including public office, academia, and civil society. She is convinced that now is a time to sow and that organized civil society will trigger the profound changes needed to rescue the country.

Edith Calderón

Edith Calderón

Vicepresident

Originally from Michoacan, she studied Business Administration and holds an M.A. in Human Rights from the Ibero, as well as a specialization in Finances from the ITAM. She is convinced that social change is only possible if citizens value their participation and fully commit to a cause they identify with.

Gabriela Paredes

Gabriela Paredes

Secretary

She holds a B.A. in Pedagogy from the Panamerican University and specialized in Human Development at the Humanist Institute of Gestalt Psychotherapy A.C. She has more than 20 years of experience in Human Resources, focused on obtaining high productivity based on the personal empowerment of employees.

Betty Van Cauwelaert

Betty Van Cauwelaert

Treasurer

She has lived in Mexico for over 30 years and is director of Grupo Fogra, which succeeds in facing the challenge of being economically viable and also socially responsible. She is interested in social development and profoundly convinced that true change will be obtained through women.

María Eugenia Baz

María Eugenia Baz

She is a lawyer with an M.A. in Human Development and has focused her work on two topics: human development and women. She is certain that when a group of organized women have the elements they need to achieve their goals, the benefits are extended to their families, communities, and the whole country.

Lucero González

Lucero González

A feminist, sociologist, and photographer who was accidently born in Mexico City, but is more Oaxacan than a tlayuda. She focuses her gaze and heart on women, whom she pictures, listens to, orients, scrutinizes, and questions. She directs the Museo de Mujeres Artistas Mexicanas (Museum of Mexican Female Artists).

Luna Marán

Luna Marán

Luna studied Audiovisual Arts at the Universidad de Guadalajara. She is a photographer, producer, director, and arts administrator. She founded the Itinerant Audiovisual Camp, and the Network of Community Movie theaters ‘Aquí Cine’, where gender equity and communality are included as common themes throughout the projects.

Patricia Piñones

Patricia Piñones

She holds a Masters in Psychology from the Department of Psychology at the UNAM and a PhD in Pedagogy from the same university. Her areas of focus and research are: youth, sexuality, gender, incorporating gender perspective, and developing public policy, as well as training on gender for governmental, educational, and civil society institutions.

Carolina Coppel

Carolina Coppel

She has committed her professional life to battling poverty and inequality. She understands inequality is due to both lack of resources and capabilities, and also unequal power distribution in society. She believes in the power of collective work, creativity, networks, and civic engagement.

Paloma Bonfil

Paloma Bonfil

President

A historian and ethno-historian, Paloma also holds a PhD in rural sociology. She has dedicated her work to indigenous women from the diverse positions she has held including public office, academia, and civil society. She is convinced that now is a time to sow and that organized civil society will trigger the profound changes needed to rescue the country.

Edith Calderón

Edith Calderón

Vicepresident

Originally from Michoacan, she studied Business Administration and holds an M.A. in Human Rights from the Ibero, as well as a specialization in Finances from the ITAM. She is convinced that social change is only possible if citizens value their participation and fully commit to a cause they identify with.

Gabriela Paredes

Gabriela Paredes

Secretary

She holds a B.A. in Pedagogy from the Panamerican University and specialized in Human Development at the Humanist Institute of Gestalt Psychotherapy A.C. She has more than 20 years of experience in Human Resources, focused on obtaining high productivity based on the personal empowerment of employees.

Betty Van Cauwelaert

Betty Van Cauwelaert

Treasurer

She has lived in Mexico for over 30 years and is director of Grupo Fogra, which succeeds in facing the challenge of being economically viable and also socially responsible. She is interested in social development and profoundly convinced that true change will be obtained through women.

María Eugenia Baz

María Eugenia Baz

She is a lawyer with an M.A. in Human Development and has focused her work on two topics: human development and women. She is certain that when a group of organized women have the elements they need to achieve their goals, the benefits are extended to their families, communities, and the whole country.

Lucero González

Lucero González

A feminist, sociologist, and photographer who was accidently born in Mexico City, but is more Oaxacan than a tlayuda. She focuses her gaze and heart on women, whom she pictures, listens to, orients, scrutinizes, and questions. She directs the Museo de Mujeres Artistas Mexicanas (Museum of Mexican Female Artists).

Luna Marán

Luna Marán

Luna studied Audiovisual Arts at the Universidad de Guadalajara. She is a photographer, producer, director, and arts administrator. She founded the Itinerant Audiovisual Camp, and the Network of Community Movie theaters ‘Aquí Cine’, where gender equity and communality are included as common themes throughout the projects.

Patricia Piñones

Patricia Piñones

She holds a Masters in Psychology from the Department of Psychology at the UNAM and a PhD in Pedagogy from the same university. Her areas of focus and research are: youth, sexuality, gender, incorporating gender perspective, and developing public policy, as well as training on gender for governmental, educational, and civil society institutions.

Carolina Coppel

Carolina Coppel

She has committed her professional life to battling poverty and inequality. She understands inequality is due to both lack of resources and capabilities, and also unequal power distribution in society. She believes in the power of collective work, creativity, networks, and civic engagement.

what-is-fondo-semillas

What is Fondo Semillas?

Fondo Semillas is a non-profit organization focused on improving women’s lives in Mexico. We dream of a country where all women, indigenous, mestiza, black, young, migrant, heterosexual, lesbian, mothers, and students alike, can make their own decisions and have access to health services, a decent job, justice, and happiness.

To achieve this, Fondo Semillas supports groups and organizations of women. Throughout the past 25 years, Fondo Semillas has directly benefited more than 640 thousand women and 2.4 million more women, girls, boys, and men indirectly.

ques

Examples of women Fondo Semillas supports include:

  • Midwives who work to prevent maternal mortality rates and obstetric violence
  • Maquila women workers who fight sexual harassment and unfair salaries
  • Indigenous and rural women who defend their right to own land
  • Domestic workers who seek to make their line of work just as acknowledged and respected as any other
  • Indigenous women cooperatives that develop sustainable projects
  • Young women focused on eradicating discrimination and gender based violence

Instead of providing a short-term solution to the conditions of injustice and inequality women face in Mexico, Fondo Semillas works to structurally fight these issues in order to modify them.

Organized women themselves identify the problems they face and propose solutions. Fondo Semillas provides them with economic resources, capacity building, accompaniment, and also strengthens their abilities and alliance building, particularly regarding key actors, such as donors and strategic network building in order to position their work.

identities

Identities

In Mexico, being a woman is a risk factor that exposes us to discrimination, violence, and inequality.

In addition to the traditional forms of violence against women (i.e. gender-based violence in the private sphere; discrimination based on gender, sexual orientation or race; sexual harassment; women as spoils of war; the resurgence of feminicides…), new forms of violence have arisen that respond to the country’s socioeconomic and political decomposition. These include threats to human rights defenders’ safety, forced disappearances, the struggle of mothers and sisters who are searching for their missing family members, among others.

At Fondo Semillas we support organized women who fight to be respected in full recognition of their different identities, make themselves visible, be represented and represent. We dream of ending discrimination towards women and that they may all live in freedom and fully exercising their identities.

The Identities program includes, among other topics:

  • Fighting discrimination towards:
    • Afromexican and indigenous women
    • Lesbian, bisexual, and trans women
    • Girls, young women, adult women
    • Women with disabilities
  • Support for:
    • Women searching for missing family members
    • Migrant women
    • Incarcerated women
    • Women human rights defenders
  • Gender based violence
  • Feminicides

Stories

Their bare feet set the rhythm of the dance, representing a closure of the process that began in 2015. It was then that the women who are dancing…

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SOME DATA

  • Over 8 million indigenous women in Mexico suffer violence.
  • 8.4% of Afro-Mexican women do not know how to read or write.
  • 44.1% of people would not be willing to have lesbians living in their home.
  • There are 2.5 more million women than men in poverty.

.

OUR WORK

  • Over 41 million pesos invested in this program.
  • 170 projects supported in these topics, 22% total
  • Chihuahua is the state with most support

.

Sources: Identities: CONAPRED (ENADIS 2010), CNDH, Intercensal Survey INEGI 2015

land

Land

Through its Land program Fondo Semillas aims to focus on women’s relationship with nature and their role as defenders of indigenous territory and culture. It also emphasizes their participation in the agricultural production, even without being owners of the land they care for, as well as their great potential to respond to the effects of climate change and trigger innovative strategies for sustainable community development.

Natural resources generate economic, political, cultural, and social value, and women must be able to access this value. Environmental degradation and land exploitation are consequences of the same system that discriminates, oppresses, and exploits women. Thus, while also including an ecofeminist perspective, Fondo Semillas supports social struggles aiming to change a system that uncontrollably exploits land and territories.

The Land program includes, among other topics:

  • Defending territory and land from the extractive industry
  • Women’s right to land property
  • Socio-environmental justice
  • Sustainable development

Stories

“Women who defend the land are like little ants who are constantly working and sowing seeds so that any citizen of the world may breathe pure air, drink clean water, eat healthy; regardless of their cultural, political, and social conditions.”

Carolina Vázquez, Member of the National Network of Indigenous Women: Weaving Rights for Mother Earth and Territory (RENAMITT) that brings together women defenders from Veracruz, Oaxaca, Guerrero, Chihuahua, Oaxaca, and Jalisco.

In a context where it is difficult for women to obtain rights over the land they work, during 2015 the RENAMITT processed and delivered 23 agrarian certificates to indigenous women, which credit them as owners of their parcels and grants them the power to decide over them.

SOME DATA

  • Women produce 60% of the world’s food, but own only 2% of the land.
  • In Mexico, women do not have voice or vote in Ejido assemblies.
  • Only 0.1% of donations worldwide support projects that respond to climate change and defend women’s rights.
  • Women are in charge of providing clean water in 69% of households.

 

OUR WORK

  • Over 10 million pesos have been invested in this program
  • Support for the RENAMITT, the only initiative of its kind in the country
  • 41 projects supported in these topics

Fuentes: Tierra: FAO, Foundation Center, Guía “Justicia Climática y Derechos de las Mujeres”

work

Work

The sexual division of work has historically relegated women to the private sphere, to domestic labors and caring for their families.

Although women have been able to insert themselves in paid labor over the past 50 years, millions of them have been obliged to employ themselves in industries where their labor rights are violated, such as in the case of domestic, maquila (factory), agricultural or sex workers. In these contexts women constantly face exploitation, violence, and discrimination.

Under the Work program, Fondo Semillas aims to support women’s autonomy by promoting their labor rights in order to guarantee proper working conditions and access to a decent life. We dream of a world that favors women’s leadership and their access to economic and political power, as well as one that promotes a greater incorporation of men in unpaid tasks and caregiving.

The Work program includes, among other topics:

  • Labor rights of factory workers, domestic workers, sex workers, day laborers, packagers, telephone operators, migrant women, etc.
  • Women’s political participation
  • Women’s participation in labor unions
  • Economic autonomy/empowerment
  • Work-family balance

Stories

From exploited workers to owners of their own shop

In 2009, a group of maquila textile workers in Coahuila were fired for defending their labor rights and rebelling against the unfair conditions they were made to work in.

Thanks to support from Fondo Semillas, they were able to organize themselves and set up the Dignity and Justice cooperative in Piedras Negras, which produces shirts, bags, sweatshirts, and other cotton articles, free from exploitation, fulfilling fair trade criteria, and with less environmental impact.

The women work in two workshops, determine their own rules, and receive double the salary large maquiladoras pay.

SOME DATA

  • Women earn up to 30% less than men for the same job.
  • 81% of men with a working age obtain income; only 51% of women do so.
  • Only one of the 32 entities in the country is governed by a woman
  • Women dedicate 59.9 hours a week to caring for their family and domestic work; men only dedicate 19.9 hours.

OUR WORK

  • Over 48 million pesos invested in this program.
  • 203 projects supported in these topics, 27% of the total
  • Chihuahua, Coahuila, Mexico City, Chiapas, and Yucatan, are the states that received most support

Sources: Trabajo: CONAPRED (ENADIS 2010), OXFAM México, “Autonomía de las mujeres e igualdad en la agenda de desarrollo sostenible” (CEPAL)